Cleft Lip

Cleft Lip

  Cleft Lip A cleft lip is a defect (gap) between the lip and or nostril edges that may occur commonly in up to 1/1000 newborns. It may often be diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound around 20 weeks of gestation. Surgical repair of the skin, mucosa, nose, and lip muscle occur around 3-4 months of age and may require presurgical molding by a process called NAM. Good aesthetic and functional results can be obtained, however, minor revisions may be necessitated when your child...

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Cleft Palate

Cleft Palate

  Cleft Palate A cleft palate is a hole in either the hard and/or soft palate due to failure of these structures to fuse in the midline during fetal growth.  This hole creates a connection (fistula) between the nose and mouth, allowing food to regurgitate through the nose, making feeding at times difficult.  Specialty bottles and nipples are available to help your child feed normally prior to surgical repair (1 year of age).  Surgical repair is delayed until one year...

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Cleft Rhinoplasty

  Cleft Rhinoplasty Clefting of the lip almost invariably involves the nose, where the rim of the nose is often malpositioned.  In addition, the septum is often deviated causing obstruction and decreases passage of air through the nose.  A remodeling of the  tip of the nose (tip rhinoplasty) can be offered at any time to help improve the appearance.  A full cleft septorhinoplasty is performed at skeletal maturity and involves correction  of the complete deformity as...

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Midface Hypoplasia

Midface Hypoplasia

  Midface Hypoplasia Cleft palates can be related to having decreased growth of the upper jaw leading to a retruded midface.  The upper teeth should sit in front (anterior) to the lower teeth in a normal bite.  Orthognathic surgery (lefort 1) can be performed to lengthen the jaw and improve projection.  This has the benefit of correcting your bite as well as significantly improving your profile appearance. Dr. Nicholas Bastidas is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon...

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Velopharanyngeal Insufficiency (VPI)

Velopharanyngeal Insufficiency (VPI)

    Velopharanyngeal Insufficiency (VPI) Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) occurs when the soft palate can not effectively close off the connection between the nose and the mouth allowing air to escape through the nose.  This make lead to very nasal speech and make it hard for people to understand your child when he or she is speaking.  The motion of the soft palate can be evaluated using endoscopy (small camera placed through the nose).  If indicated, surgery can be...

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